It takes a village...

What did you want to be when you were a kid?

When I was ten years old, I wanted to be a rockstar (didn’t we all?) To be specific, I wanted to be Avril Lavigne. I’m 26 and my brother still makes fun of me for that one…

To begin paving my way towards my destiny as a rockstar, I begged my parents to pay for me to attend music lessons. I convinced my Mom that surely without these lessons and the equipment needed, there is no way I could possibly develop into a successful member of society. Not only did my parents support this ridiculous dream, but so did my neighbors. It wasn’t uncommon for them to stop by and ask for a performance of my latest piece.

I know for a fact that my story isn’t unique. So many of us can think back and remember all the ways our parents and community pulled pennies together to encourage our dreams as children. Whether you wanted to become a pro-football player, a singer or a University graduate, I’m guessing that your parents, family and neighbors searched for ways to help make your dreams reality.

Parents in rural Uganda are no different. They too want their children to become rockstars and pro soccer players and doctors. But for families in villages like Namasale, the lessons and the uniforms and even the education needed to achieve those dreams is often too far out of reach and reserved for children living in urban areas or big cities.

 
Parents in Namasale have the same dreams for their children as their parents had for you. When you join The Circle, you’re helping to end generational poverty in partnership with families in rural Uganda.

Parents in Namasale have the same dreams for their children as their parents had for you. When you join The Circle, you’re helping to end generational poverty in partnership with families in rural Uganda.

 

How could you possibly focus on getting your kid to piano lessons when your harvest was poor and you have no money for food? How do you explain to your child that you’re keeping them home from school because their teachers stopped showing up to work? How do you help your son with his homework when you yourself can’t read? What do you tell your daughter when she’s crying because she doesn’t have any money for pads during her period?

These are the questions that families in Namasale are faced with answering every single day.

At Far Away Friends, we believe that if it takes a village to raise a child, then that village should have access to the essential tools they need (education, healthcare, opportunity) to raise tomorrow’s global citizens. No matter how rural the community, it is a human right for every child to access high quality education, healthcare services, and for their parents to have the opportunity to become financially stable.

To break children free from cycles of generational poverty, it takes a community, a village, of dedicated individuals who join together to create change -- for the kids.

When you become a part of our newest initiative, The Circle, you become part of a collective of everyday philanthropists and part of our village, by investing each month in ending generational poverty alongside families in rural Uganda.

LIVE A LIFE OF IMPACT

JOIN THE CIRCLE & BREAK THE CYCLE

 
Jayme WardComment